Eduwonk Is Fishing… Plus Teacher Turnover, Diversity, Benefits, TEACH Grants, and the Peter Principle

Andy Rotherham has gone fishin’ for the summer, but in the meantime he’s given me the keys to the blog. I can’t match his wit or his knowledge of fishing, but I’ll try to keep it lively around here. Here’s what I’ve been reading lately:

New JOLTS data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show, once again, that public education has some of the lowest turnover rates of any sector in our economy.

Kudos to NPR for sticking with this story on TEACH Grants.

Max Marchitello and Dr. Liso Grillo on how Howard University identifies diverse teacher candidates.

Cass Sunstein argues high school students applying to college are subject to excessive or unnecessary “sludge.”

Paul Bruno with data on health care costs in California schools. Short version: They’re rising much faster than other types of education spending, especially teacher salaries. Read the full report here or EdSource op-ed here.

Speaking of benefits, PDK published a good piece recently from James Shuls, Colin Hitt, and Robert Costrell on how teacher pension plans can exacerbate school finance inequities.

As we head into campaign season, Conor Williams asks what’s the best way to spend billions of dollars of new money to improve outcomes for low-income students. Is it teacher salary increases, or something else?

Alex Tabarrok on a new study on the “Peter Principle,” the idea that people keep getting promoted up the ladder until they’re no longer good at their job. There are implications here for the education field, particularly in how to think about keeping great teachers in the classroom.

Mocktail bars?

–Guest post by Chad Aldeman

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