Will The Senate Stall ESSA Reg Repeal? That Plus David Harris On The Indy Model, Pondiscio On Choice, Trucker Cats, And Valerie Jarrett On Working Across Ideological Lines. More!

It’s March 7th! On this date in 1876 Alexander Graham Bell received his patent for the telephone. More recently, in 1965 this date marked the start of the Selma to Montgomery marches during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, more commonly known as Bloody Sunday.

In the education world today that you may have missed:

Good bones! David Harris on what the Indianapolis story might teach the Trump Administration about school choice.

Republican Senator Portman (OH) says slow down on the ESSA rules repeal. 

Department of clarifications: Per yesterday’s mention of a Bloomberg story about left-leaning groups being targeted by hackers for ransom CAP’s CEO Neera Tanden pushes back on the Bloomberg account.

Valerie Jarrett on working across ideological lines to get things done. Panic at the Pondiscio on getting smart about school choice.

In my darker moments I wonder about this.

Trucker cat.

2 thoughts on “Will The Senate Stall ESSA Reg Repeal? That Plus David Harris On The Indy Model, Pondiscio On Choice, Trucker Cats, And Valerie Jarrett On Working Across Ideological Lines. More!

  1. Bruce William Smith

    H.R. 610, the Choices in Education Act of 2017, would repeal and replace the Elementary and Secondary Education Act altogether, rendering this debate about the regulations moot. Do you have any information about its likelihood of passage? I favour it, returning sovereignty over education to the states, in keeping with the Tenth Amendment and good practice in other federal governments such as Canada, which has a system of elementary and secondary education superior to that of the United States (which rules in higher education). If the federal government wants to transfer funds from wealthier states to poorer ones to aid their education, which I believe was President Johnson’s intention, let it do so; but tying all these strings to the aid, in the name of (test-based) accountability, has not protected pupils of colour, those with disabilities, or from low income families, and the pretence that it has prevents us from moving forward with more promising approaches to producing a nation whose citizens’ mix of educations should leave us unrivalled in the world.

  2. Sandy Kress

    I would hope that parents who choose schools for their children and taxpayers who pay for them will always be able to know and be able to act upon objective data that show how well the schools are producing student achievement gains.

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