Bears. At A School. In Connecticut. For Real. Elsewhere: Iowa Pensions With Chad Aldeman, Kress On Centrism, Civic Ed, Dreamers, Superintendent Salary Data, Teachers Union Money, Dogs Catching Fish! More!

Scroll down for edujobs.

In the Des Moines Register the pride of West Des Moines Valley High Chad Aldeman takes a look at the pension issue there. Phillip Burgoyne-Allen says Trump provides a Sputnik moment for civic education.

OK, looks like someone is owed an apology

Two schools in Southington, Conn., were placed in “Secure School Mode” when a black bear was spotted nearby Tuesday morning, according to WFSB.com.

Charter growth is slowing (slowing pace not negative growth)  in some places but that’s not universal – for instance in Minnesotta steady growth. Some CSC data if you really want to get all  Minnesotta charter nice.

Virginia could take a step toward having a real charter law and offering parents and students some actual choices but don’t bet on it.

Superintendent salary data.  Teachers union financial data.

Seattle Dreamer arrest context and backstory.

Noise versus signal. Or why the education debate is such a mess.

Some days you just look out at the education scene and wonder to yourself,

 Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world…

Anyway, Sandy Kress has some thoughts on all that as it relates to education.

Yesterday I put up a video of a debate about charter schools. Matt Barnum fact checks. Stuff like this is especially fun.

Opera lunch. This dog catches fish. More dog fishing action footage here.

4 thoughts on “Bears. At A School. In Connecticut. For Real. Elsewhere: Iowa Pensions With Chad Aldeman, Kress On Centrism, Civic Ed, Dreamers, Superintendent Salary Data, Teachers Union Money, Dogs Catching Fish! More!

  1. Patrick Gavin

    I can’t speak for other jurisdictions, but while our growth looks relatively low here in Nevada, the fact is we’re adding thousands of seats per year through replication. Historically our state department of education has not looked at expansion by campus–as authorizers prefer to do it–but by charter holder and model. That methodology is set to change in the next year or so as individual campuses are assigned state school code equivalents for the first time. That will reveal a very different story: as our best schools have replicated, we’ve grown from 11,000 seats in 2011 to 31,000 as of September 2016 and we’re on pace to double again in the next few years.

  2. Bob

    It would be funny if was not about lives of our kids. And how are they supposed to write their essay if they are frightened of being torn apart by Grizzly bear? The only solution here seems to be asking for professionals help.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


5 × seven =