Hillary Clinton And Higher Ed, Prisons V. Schools, Buck Up History Advocates – Was It Over When The Germans Bombed Pearl Harbor? School Finance, Teacher Salaries, Demographic Data, And Henderson On DC And What’s Next. Plus Fish Pics And Mothman!

Below are some great fish pictures with Tim Taylor. Fish Porn Mayor Kevin Kosar has some, too, on his Twitter feed. Here and here most recently.

Draft innovative assessment pilot regulations out.  The ambition for new ways of assessment bumps into the reality of assessment capacity. Alyson Klein here.

Hillary Clinton is tuning and emphasizing her college tuition proposal and its similarities with the Senator Sanders’ college proposal. This is interesting – the Clinton proposal is more targeted and not a giveaway to the wealthy as Sanders’ idea was. But it is also not universal, which makes the politics trickier especially if states get to decide whether or not to opt-in. But targeted initiatives worked well in the 1990s, will they in today’s politics?

Max Marchitello on Trump, Christie, and education finance. Kirsten Schmitz on teacher salaries and teacher demographics.

Earlier this week I wrote about all the things school districts have to do before they think about teaching and learning.

Some pushback on the charter school discipline narrative:

It turns out that it matters quite a bit which schools you compare charters to, but it also matters how you compare them. Comparing averages assumes that charters are similar to one another, but some charters might have much lower discipline rates than their neighbors while others have much higher rates.

Joe Siedlecki on growing great schools. EdBuild on little education enclaves.

Fun with percentages and bully pulpits! New analysis from the Department of Education looks at spending on corrections and spending on education (pdf). The growth of the former outpaces the latter. Underlying numbers provide some different context and confirm what anyone who follows policy already knows, we’re spending more on corrections than we used t0 but we spend a lot on education, too. The higher ed numbers are more complicated, see A.9 in the document. Still, count me among those who think we lock too many people up. But, if you really want a state spending pattern pressuring school finance to freak about? Check out Medicaid. When do we get a report on that from ED?

Here’s an important evaluation of Ohio’s voucher program (pdf). New data on the early-childhood workforce. AIR on teacher shortage and policymaker options.  Chiefs for Change on ESSA and evidence (pdf).  ACT on future educator demographics (pdf). Brookings on SNS and fed policy.

Don’t know much about history? You’ve got company. Colleges not requiring a lot of it (pdf).

Interviewing students.

Flashback: Here’s Kaya Henderson discussing what’s happened in DC and what’s next.

Mothman theories and Mothman festivals.

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