City Of Angel Charters? CREDO Analysis On LA

New CREDO analysis out on charter schools in Los Angeles. Some scuttlebutt out of CA that a lot of political resistance to this one. Why? Perhaps because it shows the sector there is very strong and adding significantly to learning for kids (pdf).  You’ll get a quick intellectual honestly gut check with this one – do the same people who use earlier CREDO data to attack the charter sector acknowledge that this one shows these schools are doing a good job in LA? If history is a guide don’t hold your breath because other CREDO studies have shown strong results within particular geographies and changed few minds. A reasonable hypothesis might be that the critics are not especially empirical.Too many proponents, meanwhile, fail to engage with the limitations of the charter strategy and the problems to date.

So what the study highlights – again – is the unevenness of the sector.  For every LA there is a school district somewhere authorizing charters to recoup some resources with little attention to quality.  For all the crazy talk about privatization, most charters are actually authorized by public school districts.  But it looks like the sector is beginning to correct and overall quality should increase, you’re seeing that in the overall data from CREDO and state data. A cynic might say that accounts for some of the race to kill off charters now.  For a good look at the charter debate it’s hard to beat this Josh Greenman column today.  And the serious conversation is about how to address the structural challenges it points up, which will matter a great deal as the charter sector grows.  You can’t run an entire school system like this.

One Response to “City Of Angel Charters? CREDO Analysis On LA”

  1. bill jones Says:

    I am perplexed that a few folks wish to defund solid AP programs at the publics and move that money to charters with very little oversight and questionable accounting practices.

    I would favor charters if:

    1. They served as alternative continuation high schools where the expelled public school students could go to the help they need.

    2. They would accept full accountability for yearly results. And that if they failed to meet those objectives they could be shut down with minimal effort. Right now it takes much to much effort on the part of concerned taxpayers and smart folks to close down low performing charters around this nation that VIOLATE THE CIVIL RIGHTS of poor victimized children on a daily basis.

    3. The charters were FORCED to reveal their funding sources, the pay levels for the staff, teacher pay, and expulsion rates.

    4. THe charters were FORCED to explain to the public that a non-profit is exactly that ONLY because it does NOT distribute retained earnings as dividends. That means charters DO EARN a NORMAL RATE OF RETURN and it is ANYONE’s guess where that dough goes.

    Forbes has thoroughly explained where it does go. It goes right back to the pockets of the “philanthropists”. Forbes reports that they can “double their money” in 7 years.

    Hey R., if you and your team could just be upfront about this you might get some more support.

    Now, I need to take you task:

    1. I was 100% correct about the student data privacy issue and brouhaha.

    2. I was 100% correct about the failure of CC.

    And I have a Stanford emeritus professor of mathematics who backs me up.

    And you have………..

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