Winner!

The judges have weighed-in!  After more than 780 entries through this post and this post, we have a winner in the Eduwonk NCLB naming contest.  I asked some educators, Hill staffers, and other assorted friends of the blog to nominate their favorites and I read every entry (that’s why this took a while).  Everyone was free to use their own criteria.   A lot of great stuff came in, funny, angry, hopeful and a lot of really clever stuff, and of course some even too tasteless for the blog (I’m talking to you Turnkey!), and some great pop culture references (but cribbing from Zoolander, while funny, doesn’t get you a book).   So, it was hard to choose but here are your winners:

Honorable mentions, who win some edubooks from Jossey-Bass, including, the Education Week Guide to K-12 Terminology, Tools for Teaching by Barbara Gross Davis, The Academic Portfolio: A Practical Guide to Documenting Teaching, Research, and Service by Peter Seldin and J. Elizabeth Miller, Teaching with Classroom Response Systems by Derek Bruff, Mega-Fun Math Games and Puzzles for the Elementary Grades, Hands on Math Projects with Real-Life Applications, Grades 3-5, Differentiated Instruction for the Middle School Language Arts Teacher, Developing Learner-Centered Teaching: A Practical Guide for Facultyby Phyullis Blumberg.  They are:

Joe Williams for suggesting Caitlin, because everyone is naming things Caitlin these days.  The entries  “Mind the gap” and  “Mental Asset Recovery Plan (MARP)” as well as “Peter” for two different entries that the judges understandably loved:  “We’re Coming For You, Japan (WCFYJ)” and the “Keep Our Daughters Off the Pole Act of 2009 (KODOPA)”, and finally the Hey, Teacher, Leave Those Kids Behind Act also earns a book.

The runner-up, who gets one of those coveted “Obama Loves Charter Schools” buttons that are circulating:

Peter, again, for, These Colors Don’t Run (from Calculus) or TCDRC.

 And the grand prize winner, who gets the highly sought-after signed picture of Justin Cohen in a tacky frame:

The Elementary and Secondary Educational Excellence Act.   If you’re going to add an ‘e’ it’s hard to beat excellence.

All prize winners should email me to arrange for their prize(s) to be mailed to them.  Thanks to everyone who sent entries and otherwise participated.

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